Medication

We can help pay for medication in the first 90 days after your accident. You do not need to contact us for approval first if:

  • you have a TAC claim number
  • your doctor or other health professional recommends it, and
  • it is for your accident injuries.

We can only pay for medication that you get from a registered pharmacist in Australia.

How to get medication

  1. Ask your doctor or other health professional if medication can help treat your transport accident injuries.
  2. Your doctor or other health professional can prescribe or recommend the medication you need.
  3. If you have a prescription, take it to a registered pharmacist. You can search for online online at https://healthengine.com.au/find/pharmacist/Australia/
  4. Give the pharmacist your TAC claim number. The pharmacist can fill your prescription and bill the TAC for your medication.
  5. If you need over the counter medicine, you need to buy it from a registered pharmacist.

When you need to ask for TAC approval:

Please contact us for approval if it is:

  • close to or more than 90 days since your accident and we haven’t already approved more medication, or
  • more than 6 months since you’ve had any treatment or service paid for by the TAC.

How to pay for treatment

In most cases, we will pay your provider.

If you have to pay, ask for a full pharmacy/dispensary receipt, which includes medication details and Medicare item numbers. Scan or take a photo of your receipt and send it to us with the ‘Upload documents’ button in MyTAC. Or email your receipt to info@tac.vic.gov.au and we will repay you.

How your pharmacist can help

Your pharmacist will prepare your medication, dispense or fill your prescriptions and give you advice about the medicines you’re taking. Medication can be very important in getting your life back on track.

Coronavirus update

The TAC is unable to send or receive hard copy documents at this time. We have some different options for you to send us forms, documents or receipts for reimbursement.

Reimbursements

  • myTAC
    Please use our app or web portal, myTAC to ask for reimbursements. Go to upload documents > reimbursement form and send us a photo of your receipt or proof of payment and a description of what you've paid for.
  • Email
    If you can't use myTAC to send your receipts, please take a photo and email it to us at info@tac.vic.gov.au. Include your claim number in the subject line of your email so we can process your request.

Forms and documents

  • myTAC
    Please use our app or web portal, myTAC to send forms or documents. Go to upload documents > submit documents and send us a photo of your form or document.
  • Email
    If you can't use myTAC to send your forms or documents, please take a photo and email it to us at info@tac.vic.gov.au. Include your claim number in the subject line of your email so we can process your request.

Summary

Use this form to claim pharmacy purchases. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medications that you need as a result of your accident injuries. You need to attach itemised, original receipts to the completed form.

Coronavirus update

The TAC is unable to send or receive hard copy documents at this time. We have some different options for you to send us forms, documents or receipts for reimbursement.

Reimbursements

  • myTAC
    Please use our app or web portal, myTAC to ask for reimbursements. Go to upload documents > reimbursement form and send us a photo of your receipt or proof of payment and a description of what you've paid for.
  • Email
    If you can't use myTAC to send your receipts, please take a photo and email it to us at info@tac.vic.gov.au. Include your claim number in the subject line of your email so we can process your request.

Forms and documents

  • myTAC
    Please use our app or web portal, myTAC to send forms or documents. Go to upload documents > submit documents and send us a photo of your form or document.
  • Email
    If you can't use myTAC to send your forms or documents, please take a photo and email it to us at info@tac.vic.gov.au. Include your claim number in the subject line of your email so we can process your request.

The TAC can pay for the reasonable cost of pharmacy expenses for the treatment of an injury or illness directly resulting from your transport accident.

Pharmacy expenses include medications purchased from a pharmacy, either by prescription or over the counter.

If your accident was before 14 February 2018, pharmacy items are subject to the medical excess

The medical excess is the cost of medical treatment you may need to reach before the TAC can start paying for your claim. If you need to reach the medical excess, the TAC will only pay for pharmacy items once you have reached it. If you haven't met the excess you can use the cost of medications you have paid for to meet this.

Please contact the TAC if you are unsure of how the medical excess applies to you.

What the TAC pays for

The TAC pays for pharmacy items that:

  • Are directly related to your transport accident injuries; and
  • Your doctor or dentist has recommended or prescribed; and
  • Are purchased from a registered pharmacy, and not from a supermarket or other retail outlet.

The TAC funds up to the maximum dose recommended by the manufacturer (this information is usually found on the back of the packet or on the accompanying information leaflet). Large quantities of repeat medications can only be funded in exceptional cases, such as overseas travel. Prior approval from the TAC is required in these cases.

Types of medication funded by the TAC

For the TAC to provide funding, your medication must be registered on the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods (ARTG). Items on this register have been thoroughly tested for safety and effectiveness; please speak to your Medical Practitioner if you are unsure whether your medication is registered.

Your prescription medication should, where appropriate, be prescribed in accordance with the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS). PBS is administered by the Federal Government to provide affordable medicine to Australians. TAC clients are entitled to medications under the PBS - you need to present your Medicare card, and Healthcare card if applicable to the dispensing pharmacist.

If you are unsure about how this applies to your medication, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Pharmacy items not covered by the TAC

Please note that not all pharmacy items are covered by the TAC. For example, the TAC does not pay for:

X Pharmacy items that are not related to your transport accident injuries

X Chinese, natural or herbal medicine

X many vitamins, minerals or complementary medications (to find out which ones, contact the TAC)

X Items not registered on the ARTG.

Claiming your expenses

You have two options for the TAC to cover your reasonable pharmacy expenses.

Option 1: reimbursement

If you pay for the pharmacy item yourself, the TAC can reimburse you. To arrange reimbursement, you need to complete a Pharmacy Declaration form. Please send this form to the TAC, GPO Box 2751 Melbourne VIC 3001 together with:

  • fully itemised tax receipts for your pharmacy information:
    • Pharmacy name and address
    • Details of the medication, including:
      • Full name of the medication or item (including brand name where possible)
      • Date dispensed or supplied
      • Status of the medication i.e. PBS (including PBS code), private or over the counter (this can be hand written)
      • Quantity of the medication (for example, number of tablets)
      • Strength of the medication (for example, 5mg, 50mg)*
      • Form of the medication (for example, tablet, capsule, caplets)*
      • Total amount charged per item*
      • Total amount paid

* May not be required for non-drug pharmacy items

  • for non-prescription items, a supporting letter item and how it is related to your transport accident injuries. At times the TAC may request a supporting letter from your doctor for prescription medications also

The TAC will accept original itemised tax receipts only. Facsimiles and emails will not be accepted.

When you drop off your scripts for your prescription medications, ask your Pharmacist for a dispensary computer-generated tax receipt to ensure all necessary information is included. Please note that a cash register receipt may not contain all this information.

Reimbursement will occur in line with the TAC's fee schedule. If a pharmacy charges above this rate you will be responsible for the difference in cost.

You have two years from the date you purchased the pharmacy item to claim repayment from the TAC.

Option 2: direct billing

You can ask your pharmacist to bill the TAC directly for your accident-related pharmacy items.

Restricted pharmacy items

The TAC has special policies to regulate the way some pharmacy items are used. These are outlined on the TAC website and a summary of some of these are as follows:

  • Some medications, referred to as 'schedule 8 drugs', (for example morphine and pethidine) are highly addictive and can be dangerous if not taken properly. The TAC will only fund schedule 8 drugs when they are prescribed in accordance with the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme.
  • Sedative medications such as Valium and Temaze have a high potential for harm and dependence. The TAC will only pay for a single prescription of any sedative within the first three years following an accident.
  • Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory creams or gels, such as Voltaren gel, can be funded for a maximum of six weeks post-accident or surgery. This funding limit is based on the manufacturer's recommendation and normal clinical use.
  • For certain types of pharmacy items, the TAC needs to approve funding before we can reimburse the cost of your medication. This applies when it is unclear how the item relates to your accident injuries. For example, medication to treat weight loss, medication to treat erectile dysfunction, and glucosamine may need to be discussed with the TAC.

Further Information

For more information please visit our Medication page or call us on 1300 654 329.

Coronavirus update

The TAC is unable to send or receive hard copy documents at this time. We have some different options for you to send us forms, documents or receipts for reimbursement.

Reimbursements

  • myTAC
    Please use our app or web portal, myTAC to ask for reimbursements. Go to upload documents > reimbursement form and send us a photo of your receipt or proof of payment and a description of what you've paid for.
  • Email
    If you can't use myTAC to send your receipts, please take a photo and email it to us at info@tac.vic.gov.au. Include your claim number in the subject line of your email so we can process your request.

Forms and documents

  • myTAC
    Please use our app or web portal, myTAC to send forms or documents. Go to upload documents > submit documents and send us a photo of your form or document.
  • Email
    If you can't use myTAC to send your forms or documents, please take a photo and email it to us at info@tac.vic.gov.au. Include your claim number in the subject line of your email so we can process your request.

Summary

Many road users are unaware the pharmacy medication they take could impair their driving, particularly if mixed with alcohol. This brochure can help you understand that some pharmacy medicines can impair your driving.

We’re here to help you get your life back on track after your transport accident. To help you recover we will pay for medication and other over-the-counter items provided by a registered pharmacist in Australia.

In the first 90 days after your accident, the TAC can help pay for your medication without the need for you to contact us for approval first.

When you need to contact us for approval

You or your provider need to contact the TAC for approval of your medication if:

  • It is approaching or more than 90 days since your accident and we have not approved further treatment or services, or
  • It has been more than 6 months since you’ve had any treatment or service paid for by the TAC.

When we can pay for pharmacy and medication expenses

In the first 90 days after your accident, if your doctor prescribes medication and other pharmacy items for your injuries, we can pay this for you without the need for you to contact us first.

After the first 90 days, you will need TAC approval for more medication.

Your doctor can provide a prescription for medication to treat your transport accident injuries and this medication will be provided by a pharmacist. You will need to give your pharmacist your TAC claim number so they can bill us directly, there's no need for you to contact us.

Other health practitioners, including optometrists and nurse practitioners, may also prescribe a limited range of medications.

We may contact your doctor and/or pharmacist to discuss your progress or request an assessment to make sure that:

  • You have access to appropriate treatment and supports required for your transport accident injuries.
  • You are getting proven, evidence-based treatment and not receiving treatment that isn't helping you recover.
  • You are moving towards getting your life back on track or being able to live independently.

Treatment and services we can’t pay for

We can’t pay for services that:

  • Do not treat your transport accident injuries.
  • Are not reasonable, necessary or appropriate.
  • Are not clinically justified, safe and effective.

What do pharmacists do?

A pharmacist will prepare your medication, dispense or fill your prescriptions and give you advice about the medicines you’re taking. Medication can be very important in getting your life back on track after an accident.

Medicines and pharmacy supplies can only be provided by a registered pharmacist, and can treat your transport accident injuries in a number of ways, including:

  • Prescription medications
  • Over-the-counter medications and pharmacy items which can be sold by a pharmacist without a prescription, e.g. dose administration aids, analgesics and laxatives, dressings, bandages, supports and syringes.

Medications may have risks associated with them. In Australia, there are systems in place to minimise these risks, including regulations on how and when certain medications are prescribed and administered. For more information please see the Pharmacy Framework and the Pharmacy Information Resources.

What we pay for

The medicines and over-the-counter items we will pay for are those:

  • Required as a result of a transport accident injury.
  • Requested or prescribed by a registered health professional with prescribing rights, such as a doctor/GP, dentist, nurse, midwife or optometrist, and provided by a registered pharmacist.

We can help pay for:

  • Medication prescribed in accordance with the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) and registered (not listed) on the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods (ARTG), including:
    • Drugs of Dependence (schedule 8 medicines), schedule 3 and schedule 4 medicines that adhere to the relevant legal requirements relating to their prescribing, dispensing and clinical use.
    • Erectile dysfunction medication in oral or injectable form, up to a maximum of 8 intermittent use tablets or injections per month, or low dosage daily use tablets.
    • Bacterial vaccinations (pneumococcal, meningococcal and haemophilus B) and the influenza vaccine for clients who have had a splenectomy or have a severe pulmonary condition as a result of their transport accident.
  • Privately prescribed medications that are clinically appropriate for the accident-related injury or illness, where there is no readily available alternative on the PBS.
  • “Off label” medication that is supported by National Health & Medical Research Council level 1 or 2 evidence.

We can help pay for over the counter items that are recommended by a medical practitioner or dentist, such as:

  • Vitamins, minerals and complementary medications that are listed (as opposed to registered) on the ARTG:
    • Vitamin C – in the form of ascorbic acid where required by a client with bladder complications and who is taking Hiprex as a urinary antisepsis.
    • Vitamin C and iron – required by a client who has donated their own blood for use in an impending operation.
    • Vitamin C and zinc – for up to 6 weeks, for a client who has poor wound healing.
    • Zinc – required by a client who has a zinc deficiency as a result of the transport accident.
    • Vitamin E cream – to treat scarring for up to two years post-accident.
    • Glucosamine – in oral form to treat osteoarthritis affecting non-spinal joint.
    • Hypericum (St John’s Wort) – to replace PBS and/or private script medications for the treatment of accident related depressive disorders.
    • Vaccinium Macrocarpon (Cranberry product) – for the prevention of urinary tract infections in accident-related neuropathic bladders.
  • Scar concealing products.
  • Dose administration aids and the reasonable weekly refill cost.
  • Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as gels, creams and sprays – for a period of six weeks, immediately after an accident or following surgery.
  • Infant formula products recommended by a medical practitioner and required as a result of a transport accident injury.
  • Sunscreen, where required, to counteract the effects of sun-sensitive medications or for patients with skin grafting and burn injuries.

Controlled medicines and drugs of dependence

Some medications if misused or overused have a high risk potential for harm, dependence and accidental death from poisoning. Controlled medications are subject to strict controls under the law and include medications such as sedatives and opioid analgesics.

If you have been prescribed a controlled medication, it is important that you pay close attention to any instructions from your doctor and pharmacist, to minimise the risks associated with taking a medication of this type. We encourage you to seek further information from your medical practitioner or pharmacist or see: Pharmacy Framework.

How treatments and services are paid for

We pay for your medication:

  • Directly to your pharmacist, when you have given them your TAC claim number, or
  • If you have to pay, use myTAC to send a copy of your receipt to us and we will repay you. Ask for a full pharmacy/dispensary receipt, which includes medication details and Medicare item numbers, and is more detailed than a cash register receipt.

We pay for your services in line with our responsibilities under the Transport Accident Act 1986.

How much we will pay

We will pay for your treatment and services according to our fee schedule. If your pharmacist charges more than the TAC rate, you may need to pay the difference.

We will pay for pharmacy and over-the-counter items in line with the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) where applicable. The Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) provides subsidised prescription medicines to residents of Australia.

Where your pharmacist charges above the PBS rate, or the over-the-counter item is not on the PBS, you may need to pay the difference, if it's not covered by Medicare and any private health insurance.

We can also pay for the reasonable cost of private scripts dispensed by a pharmacy. If the cost of your private script exceeds our rate, you may need to pay the gap.

If your accident was before 14 February 2018, we can only pay for these services once any required medical excess has been reached. Find out if the medical excess applies to you.

For providers

If you are a provider of pharmacy services, please refer to our TAC Provider Guidelines.

Pharmacy Framework

The Guiding Principles for Medicine Management for the Transport Accident Commission, Clients and Providers

Introduction

The Transport Accident Commission (TAC) recognises that it is a partner in achieving better health outcomes in conjunction with the Commonwealth Government and Victorian State Government in line with The National Medicines Policy 1999, The National Drug Strategy (2010-2015), The National Strategy for the Quality Use of Medicines 2002, The National Pain Strategy (2010) and The National Mental health Policy 2008.  As a partner the TAC is resolutely committed to be engaged in a cooperative endeavour to bring about better health outcomes focusing on access to, and best practice use, of medicines.  This includes prescription medicines, non-prescription medicines and complementary healthcare products.

Access to Medicines

The TAC acknowledges that there are potential risks associated with the access to and use of medicines by its clients.  These risks, as well as the potential public health implications, are primarily addressed through the scheduling of medicines by the Therapeutic Goods Administration.  Access to medicines is further controlled by the intervention of suitably qualified health practitioners to ensure appropriate use of medicines by patients. The TAC overlays this existing guidance with its own policies controlling the access to medicine requiring compliance on behalf of health practitioners and clients in order to secure funding for medicines.

Administration of Medicines in the Community

The TAC acknowledges that there is an existing framework that regulates the administration of medicines once they have been prescribed and dispensed for an individual.  The TAC requires its providers to take into account all existing legislative obligations in determining their own policies, guidelines, protocols and training for the administration of medicines to clients in the community.  The TAC makes provision within its own policies for appropriate conduct and training for health professionals and aligns with existing Victorian State Government legislative requirements where applicable; for example the Nurses Act 1993.  Where there is no guiding legislation, the TAC has developed its own policies that determine the threshold of qualification and conduct required to satisfy requests for funding medicines.

Quality, Safety and Efficacy of Medicines

All partners in the National Medicines Policy 2000 are complicit in considering the quality, safety and efficacy of medicines available.  To this end, the TAC aligns with the national standardised regulation of medicines via the Therapeutic Goods Administration.  The TAC implements its own regime of policy controls which overlays the requirements that exist in the Therapeutic Goods Administration’s scheduling as a condition of funding medicines for TAC clients.

Quality Use of Medicines

TAC recognises that Australia has an established and well accepted national policy on the quality use of medicines.  The TAC in alignment with the National Medicines Policy 2000 considers that all medicines should be used:

  • judiciously – medicines, whether prescribed, recommended, and/or self-selected should be used only when appropriate, with non-medicinal alternatives considered as needed;
  • appropriately – choosing the most appropriate medicine, taking into account factors such as the clinical condition being treated, the potential risks and benefits of treatment, dosage, length of treatment, and cost;
  • safely – misuse, including overuse and underuse, should be minimised; and
  • efficaciously – the medicines must achieve the goals of therapy by delivering beneficial changes in actual health outcomes.

To achieve quality use of medicines TAC clients must be provided with the most appropriate treatment, and have the knowledge and skills to use medicines to their best effect. The TAC in partnership with treating health practitioners have an important role to play in promoting the quality use of medicines through collaboration, communication, development and implementation of models of best practice.  The TAC, health care professionals and providers of medicines all play an important role in making sure that clients receive suitable information and/or assistance so that they are able to take their medicines correctly.

To support the achievement of the optimum use of medicines the TAC has a dedicated Clinical Panel to provide clinical support and advice to health professionals treating people injured in a transport accident.  The Clinical Panel is made up of experienced health professionals and also provides clinical support and advice to TAC Claims staff to ensure that decisions related to the provision of medicines are informed and justified.

Quality use of medicines depends on committed teamwork between all members of the partnership on behalf of the Australian community.

Risk Management

The TAC has a duty of care to its clients to protect them against products, production process and services that are hazardous to health or life.  The TAC is responsible for having a system in place that meets its own legislative functions under the Transport Accident Act 1986 section 11 in delivering compensation to its clients in socially and economically appropriate manner.  Accordingly the TAC has implemented a number of policies surrounding the payment of medicines.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Resources

All health care professionals, care workers and TAC clients should have access to current, accurate and balanced information about medicines including Consumer Medicine Information and advice about medicine use in a timely manner.

It is imperative that health care professionals establish a client’s level of understanding of their medication including how to take it and the consequences of what happens if they do not administer the medication in the correct manner.  Health care professionals should take into account the client’s literacy, language skills and cultural background in the context of their medication regime.

The following resources provide information about prescription, non-prescription medicines and complementary health care products for clients and health care professionals. Please note that the information provided below is not moderated by the TAC and that the TAC makes no warranty as to the relevance or accuracy of the information. 1

Adverse Medicine Events Line

The Adverse Medicine Events Line allows consumers to report or receive advice on adverse medicine events.

Telephone 1300 134 237

Australian Council for Safety and Quality in Health Care

The 10 Tips for Safer Health Care booklet has been produced by the Safety and Quality Council to assist people to become more actively involved in their health care. It explains how and why things can go wrong, and how consumers can work in partnership with their health care professionals to get the best possible care. The booklet also:

  • gives 10 tips for improving health care, which include questions consumers might like to ask their health care professional
  • outlines what consumers can expect from their health care professional
  • lists some sources of information for consumers to find out more about their condition and how to manage medicines; and
  • explains what consumers can do if they have concerns about their health care.

For more information see www.safetyandquality.org/index.cfm?page=publication#10tips

Consumer Medicine Information (CMI)

CMI is designed to inform consumers about prescription and pharmacist-only medicines. CMI leaflets are brand specific and are produced by the pharmaceutical company that makes the particular medicine. They might be included in the medicine package, but can always be requested from the pharmacist or doctor. A CMI guide is available, which provides information about how CMI can be used by consumers and health care professionals to build better relationships to achieve the quality use of medicines. Refer to:

HealthInsite

HealthInsite is an Australian Government initiative, funded by the Department of Health and Ageing. It aims to improve the health of Australians by providing easy access to quality information about human health. Go to: www.healthinsite.gov.au

Medicines Line

Medicines Line gives consumers access to independent, accurate, up-to-date and specific information about medicines, provided by experienced medicines information specialists and clinical pharmacists. Telephone 1300 888 763.

Medicines Talk

Medicines Talk is produced by consumers, for consumers, to encourage and promote quality use of medicines, especially among people who use multiple medicines. Medicines Talk can be downloaded in PDF format from the NPS web site: www.nps.org.au/site.php?content+/resources/content/cons_medtalk.html Telephone (02) 8217 8700.

Medimate

Medimate is a brochure produced by the National Prescribing Service (NPS) to help consumers find, understand and use information about medicines. Medimate encourages consumers to do this in partnership with their doctors, pharmacists, and other health care professionals. Medimate covers prescription medicines, non‑prescription medicines and complementary health care products. It includes advice about keeping healthy with and without medicines, how to use medicines safely, and using multiple medicines safely. Medimate also includes a special medicines list in which consumers can list their medicines and keep notes. Available at: www.nps.org.au Telephone (02)8217 8700

Veterans’ MATES

Veterans’ MATES (Medicines Advice and Therapeutics Education Services) is a Department of Veterans’ Affairs program designed to address medicines usage by veterans and war widows and to reduce medicines misadventure. The Department works closely with the University of South Australia, Quality Use of Medicines and Pharmacy Research Centre, which has formed a consortium with the National Prescribing Service, Drug and Therapeutics Information Service, Australian Medicines Handbook, University of Adelaide Department of General Practice and Public Health, and the Pharmacy Department of Daw Park Hospital, for delivery of the program. Veterans’ MATES uses prescription data to identify veterans who may be at risk of medication misadventure and provides information which may assist in improving their medication management. GPs are provided with feedback on their veteran patients and information detailing current clinical guidelines through mailout. The program also provides educational materials to veterans and their carers to assist in improving medication management at home. Veterans’ MATES will deliver ten modules targeting specific clinical and therapeutic topics over the next three years. The modules will include material for GPs, other health care professionals and veterans.

Adverse Drug Reactions Advisory Committee (ADRAC)

The ADRAC encourages reporting of all suspected adverse reactions to medicines, including suspected reactions to new medicines, suspected interactions of medicines, and suspected reactions causing death, admission to hospital or prolongation of hospitalisation, increased investigations or treatment, or birth defects. The ADRAC produces the Australian Adverse Drug Reactions Bulletin six times a year. The bulletin lists current drugs of interest to ADRAC, and referenced information on drugs that are the subject of reports to ADRAC. Contact the ADRAC Secretariat: Telephone 1800044114, email adrac@health.gov.au or refer to www.tga.gov.au/adr/index/htm

Australian Drug Information for the Health Care Professional (AusDI)

AusDI is a comprehensive, authoritative, unbiased source of drug and therapeutic information developed for Australian pharmacists, doctors, nurses and other health care professionals. It is a database of single and family generic drug information monographs, including the most commonly used complementary health care products. Information is available at: www.ausdi.com

Australian Medicines Handbook (AMH)

The AMH provides a source of readily accessible, concise, up to date independent drug information to facilitate effective, rational, safe and economical prescribing. Available at: www.amh.net.au

Australian Medicines Handbook (AMH) Drug Choice Companion: Aged Care

This contains independent drug information that promotes safe and rational use of medicines in older Australians. Available at: www.amh.net.au/dcc.html

Australian Pharmaceutical Formulary (APF)

The APF and Handbook (APF) is designed to assist pharmacists in providing pharmaceutical services that promote optimal health outcomes through the quality use of medicines. APF-19 provides core information on therapeutics and standards of practice. Available at: www.psa.org.au

Australian Prescriber

Australian Prescriber is an independent publication providing readily accessible information about drugs and therapeutics. Available at: www.australianprescriber.com

Australian Prescription Products (APP) Guide

The APP Guide contains a comprehensive listing of prescription product information approved by the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) and compiled specifically for pharmacists. Available at: www.appco.com.au/appguide

Central Australian Rural Practitioners Association (CARPA) Standard Treatment Manual

CARPA developed this manual as a guide to standard treatment for those working in remote and rural communities in Central and Northern Australia. Available at: www.carpa.org.au

MIMS Annual

MIMS Annual is a comprehensive, up-to-date drug reference system. It is classified by therapeutic class, fully indexed, and contains complete, detailed, approved prescribing information for over 2000 prescription and non-prescription drugs. Available at: www.mims.com.au

National Prescribing Services (NPS)

The NPS is a not-for-profit Australian organisation established to provide a source of evidence-based information about medicines. The NPS is independent of government and the pharmaceutical industry. Available at: www.nps.org.au

RADAR (Rational Assessment of Drugs and Research)

NPS RADAR provides timely, independent, evidence-based information on new drugs, research and PBS listings. It’s published by the National Prescribing Service (NPS) for general practitioners, specialists, pharmacists, other health care professionals and consumers. RADAR can be accessed over the internet, either by registering online to receive email alerts, or by simply logging on to the website. RADAR can also be accessed using one of the major prescribing software packages, or by emailing a request for a hard copy to: info@nps.org.au or refer to www.npsradar.org.au

Schedule of Pharmaceutical Benefits

The Schedule of Pharmaceutical Benefits provides information about the arrangements for doctors and participating dental practitioners to prescribe pharmaceutical benefits, and the supply of pharmaceutical benefits by approved pharmacists, approved doctors and approved hospital authorities. Available at www.health.gov.au/pbs/index.htm

Therapeutic Advice and Information (TAIS) Line

The National Prescribing Service provides a Therapeutic Advice and Information Service (TAIS) for health care professionals. For the cost of a local call, the TAIS provides immediate access to independent drug and therapeutics information. Telephone 1300138677, email tais@nps.org.au

Therapeutic Guidelines

Therapeutic Guidelines are disease-oriented guidelines for prescribing. They provide clear, practical and succinct recommendations for therapy, derived from the best available scientific evidence. Available at: Telephone 1800 061 260, sales@tg.com.au, www.tg.com.au


1The resources provided above are not updated or monitored by the TAC.  All enquiries should be directed to the relevant organisation.

We can help pay for medication in the first 90 days after your accident. You do not need to contact us for approval first if:

  • you have a TAC claim number
  • your doctor or other health professional recommends it, and
  • it is for your accident injuries.

We can only pay for medication that you get from a registered pharmacist in Australia.

How to get medication

  1. Ask your doctor or other health professional if medication can help treat your transport accident injuries.
  2. Your doctor or other health professional can prescribe or recommend the medication you need.
  3. If you have a prescription, take it to a registered pharmacist. You can search for online online at https://healthengine.com.au/find/pharmacist/Australia/
  4. Give the pharmacist your TAC claim number. The pharmacist can fill your prescription and bill the TAC for your medication.
  5. If you need over the counter medicine, you need to buy it from a registered pharmacist.

When you need to ask for TAC approval:

Please contact us for approval if it is:

  • close to or more than 90 days since your accident and we haven’t already approved more medication, or
  • more than 6 months since you’ve had any treatment or service paid for by the TAC.

How to pay for treatment

In most cases, we will pay your provider.

If you have to pay, ask for a full pharmacy/dispensary receipt, which includes medication details and Medicare item numbers. Scan or take a photo of your receipt and send it to us with the ‘Upload documents’ button in MyTAC. Or email your receipt to info@tac.vic.gov.au and we will repay you.

How your pharmacist can help

Your pharmacist will prepare your medication, dispense or fill your prescriptions and give you advice about the medicines you’re taking. Medication can be very important in getting your life back on track.

Coronavirus update

The TAC is unable to send or receive hard copy documents at this time. We have some different options for you to send us forms, documents or receipts for reimbursement.

Reimbursements

  • myTAC
    Please use our app or web portal, myTAC to ask for reimbursements. Go to upload documents > reimbursement form and send us a photo of your receipt or proof of payment and a description of what you've paid for.
  • Email
    If you can't use myTAC to send your receipts, please take a photo and email it to us at info@tac.vic.gov.au. Include your claim number in the subject line of your email so we can process your request.

Forms and documents

  • myTAC
    Please use our app or web portal, myTAC to send forms or documents. Go to upload documents > submit documents and send us a photo of your form or document.
  • Email
    If you can't use myTAC to send your forms or documents, please take a photo and email it to us at info@tac.vic.gov.au. Include your claim number in the subject line of your email so we can process your request.

Summary

Use this form to claim pharmacy purchases. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medications that you need as a result of your accident injuries. You need to attach itemised, original receipts to the completed form.

Coronavirus update

The TAC is unable to send or receive hard copy documents at this time. We have some different options for you to send us forms, documents or receipts for reimbursement.

Reimbursements

  • myTAC
    Please use our app or web portal, myTAC to ask for reimbursements. Go to upload documents > reimbursement form and send us a photo of your receipt or proof of payment and a description of what you've paid for.
  • Email
    If you can't use myTAC to send your receipts, please take a photo and email it to us at info@tac.vic.gov.au. Include your claim number in the subject line of your email so we can process your request.

Forms and documents

  • myTAC
    Please use our app or web portal, myTAC to send forms or documents. Go to upload documents > submit documents and send us a photo of your form or document.
  • Email
    If you can't use myTAC to send your forms or documents, please take a photo and email it to us at info@tac.vic.gov.au. Include your claim number in the subject line of your email so we can process your request.

The TAC can pay for the reasonable cost of pharmacy expenses for the treatment of an injury or illness directly resulting from your transport accident.

Pharmacy expenses include medications purchased from a pharmacy, either by prescription or over the counter.

If your accident was before 14 February 2018, pharmacy items are subject to the medical excess

The medical excess is the cost of medical treatment you may need to reach before the TAC can start paying for your claim. If you need to reach the medical excess, the TAC will only pay for pharmacy items once you have reached it. If you haven't met the excess you can use the cost of medications you have paid for to meet this.

Please contact the TAC if you are unsure of how the medical excess applies to you.

What the TAC pays for

The TAC pays for pharmacy items that:

  • Are directly related to your transport accident injuries; and
  • Your doctor or dentist has recommended or prescribed; and
  • Are purchased from a registered pharmacy, and not from a supermarket or other retail outlet.

The TAC funds up to the maximum dose recommended by the manufacturer (this information is usually found on the back of the packet or on the accompanying information leaflet). Large quantities of repeat medications can only be funded in exceptional cases, such as overseas travel. Prior approval from the TAC is required in these cases.

Types of medication funded by the TAC

For the TAC to provide funding, your medication must be registered on the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods (ARTG). Items on this register have been thoroughly tested for safety and effectiveness; please speak to your Medical Practitioner if you are unsure whether your medication is registered.

Your prescription medication should, where appropriate, be prescribed in accordance with the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS). PBS is administered by the Federal Government to provide affordable medicine to Australians. TAC clients are entitled to medications under the PBS - you need to present your Medicare card, and Healthcare card if applicable to the dispensing pharmacist.

If you are unsure about how this applies to your medication, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Pharmacy items not covered by the TAC

Please note that not all pharmacy items are covered by the TAC. For example, the TAC does not pay for:

X Pharmacy items that are not related to your transport accident injuries

X Chinese, natural or herbal medicine

X many vitamins, minerals or complementary medications (to find out which ones, contact the TAC)

X Items not registered on the ARTG.

Claiming your expenses

You have two options for the TAC to cover your reasonable pharmacy expenses.

Option 1: reimbursement

If you pay for the pharmacy item yourself, the TAC can reimburse you. To arrange reimbursement, you need to complete a Pharmacy Declaration form. Please send this form to the TAC, GPO Box 2751 Melbourne VIC 3001 together with:

  • fully itemised tax receipts for your pharmacy information:
    • Pharmacy name and address
    • Details of the medication, including:
      • Full name of the medication or item (including brand name where possible)
      • Date dispensed or supplied
      • Status of the medication i.e. PBS (including PBS code), private or over the counter (this can be hand written)
      • Quantity of the medication (for example, number of tablets)
      • Strength of the medication (for example, 5mg, 50mg)*
      • Form of the medication (for example, tablet, capsule, caplets)*
      • Total amount charged per item*
      • Total amount paid

* May not be required for non-drug pharmacy items

  • for non-prescription items, a supporting letter item and how it is related to your transport accident injuries. At times the TAC may request a supporting letter from your doctor for prescription medications also

The TAC will accept original itemised tax receipts only. Facsimiles and emails will not be accepted.

When you drop off your scripts for your prescription medications, ask your Pharmacist for a dispensary computer-generated tax receipt to ensure all necessary information is included. Please note that a cash register receipt may not contain all this information.

Reimbursement will occur in line with the TAC's fee schedule. If a pharmacy charges above this rate you will be responsible for the difference in cost.

You have two years from the date you purchased the pharmacy item to claim repayment from the TAC.

Option 2: direct billing

You can ask your pharmacist to bill the TAC directly for your accident-related pharmacy items.

Restricted pharmacy items

The TAC has special policies to regulate the way some pharmacy items are used. These are outlined on the TAC website and a summary of some of these are as follows:

  • Some medications, referred to as 'schedule 8 drugs', (for example morphine and pethidine) are highly addictive and can be dangerous if not taken properly. The TAC will only fund schedule 8 drugs when they are prescribed in accordance with the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme.
  • Sedative medications such as Valium and Temaze have a high potential for harm and dependence. The TAC will only pay for a single prescription of any sedative within the first three years following an accident.
  • Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory creams or gels, such as Voltaren gel, can be funded for a maximum of six weeks post-accident or surgery. This funding limit is based on the manufacturer's recommendation and normal clinical use.
  • For certain types of pharmacy items, the TAC needs to approve funding before we can reimburse the cost of your medication. This applies when it is unclear how the item relates to your accident injuries. For example, medication to treat weight loss, medication to treat erectile dysfunction, and glucosamine may need to be discussed with the TAC.

Further Information

For more information please visit our Medication page or call us on 1300 654 329.

Coronavirus update

The TAC is unable to send or receive hard copy documents at this time. We have some different options for you to send us forms, documents or receipts for reimbursement.

Reimbursements

  • myTAC
    Please use our app or web portal, myTAC to ask for reimbursements. Go to upload documents > reimbursement form and send us a photo of your receipt or proof of payment and a description of what you've paid for.
  • Email
    If you can't use myTAC to send your receipts, please take a photo and email it to us at info@tac.vic.gov.au. Include your claim number in the subject line of your email so we can process your request.

Forms and documents

  • myTAC
    Please use our app or web portal, myTAC to send forms or documents. Go to upload documents > submit documents and send us a photo of your form or document.
  • Email
    If you can't use myTAC to send your forms or documents, please take a photo and email it to us at info@tac.vic.gov.au. Include your claim number in the subject line of your email so we can process your request.

Summary

Many road users are unaware the pharmacy medication they take could impair their driving, particularly if mixed with alcohol. This brochure can help you understand that some pharmacy medicines can impair your driving.

We’re here to help you get your life back on track after your transport accident. To help you recover we will pay for medication and other over-the-counter items provided by a registered pharmacist in Australia.

In the first 90 days after your accident, the TAC can help pay for your medication without the need for you to contact us for approval first.

When you need to contact us for approval

You or your provider need to contact the TAC for approval of your medication if:

  • It is approaching or more than 90 days since your accident and we have not approved further treatment or services, or
  • It has been more than 6 months since you’ve had any treatment or service paid for by the TAC.

When we can pay for pharmacy and medication expenses

In the first 90 days after your accident, if your doctor prescribes medication and other pharmacy items for your injuries, we can pay this for you without the need for you to contact us first.

After the first 90 days, you will need TAC approval for more medication.

Your doctor can provide a prescription for medication to treat your transport accident injuries and this medication will be provided by a pharmacist. You will need to give your pharmacist your TAC claim number so they can bill us directly, there's no need for you to contact us.

Other health practitioners, including optometrists and nurse practitioners, may also prescribe a limited range of medications.

We may contact your doctor and/or pharmacist to discuss your progress or request an assessment to make sure that:

  • You have access to appropriate treatment and supports required for your transport accident injuries.
  • You are getting proven, evidence-based treatment and not receiving treatment that isn't helping you recover.
  • You are moving towards getting your life back on track or being able to live independently.

Treatment and services we can’t pay for

We can’t pay for services that:

  • Do not treat your transport accident injuries.
  • Are not reasonable, necessary or appropriate.
  • Are not clinically justified, safe and effective.

What do pharmacists do?

A pharmacist will prepare your medication, dispense or fill your prescriptions and give you advice about the medicines you’re taking. Medication can be very important in getting your life back on track after an accident.

Medicines and pharmacy supplies can only be provided by a registered pharmacist, and can treat your transport accident injuries in a number of ways, including:

  • Prescription medications
  • Over-the-counter medications and pharmacy items which can be sold by a pharmacist without a prescription, e.g. dose administration aids, analgesics and laxatives, dressings, bandages, supports and syringes.

Medications may have risks associated with them. In Australia, there are systems in place to minimise these risks, including regulations on how and when certain medications are prescribed and administered. For more information please see the Pharmacy Framework and the Pharmacy Information Resources.

What we pay for

The medicines and over-the-counter items we will pay for are those:

  • Required as a result of a transport accident injury.
  • Requested or prescribed by a registered health professional with prescribing rights, such as a doctor/GP, dentist, nurse, midwife or optometrist, and provided by a registered pharmacist.

We can help pay for:

  • Medication prescribed in accordance with the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) and registered (not listed) on the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods (ARTG), including:
    • Drugs of Dependence (schedule 8 medicines), schedule 3 and schedule 4 medicines that adhere to the relevant legal requirements relating to their prescribing, dispensing and clinical use.
    • Erectile dysfunction medication in oral or injectable form, up to a maximum of 8 intermittent use tablets or injections per month, or low dosage daily use tablets.
    • Bacterial vaccinations (pneumococcal, meningococcal and haemophilus B) and the influenza vaccine for clients who have had a splenectomy or have a severe pulmonary condition as a result of their transport accident.
  • Privately prescribed medications that are clinically appropriate for the accident-related injury or illness, where there is no readily available alternative on the PBS.
  • “Off label” medication that is supported by National Health & Medical Research Council level 1 or 2 evidence.

We can help pay for over the counter items that are recommended by a medical practitioner or dentist, such as:

  • Vitamins, minerals and complementary medications that are listed (as opposed to registered) on the ARTG:
    • Vitamin C – in the form of ascorbic acid where required by a client with bladder complications and who is taking Hiprex as a urinary antisepsis.
    • Vitamin C and iron – required by a client who has donated their own blood for use in an impending operation.
    • Vitamin C and zinc – for up to 6 weeks, for a client who has poor wound healing.
    • Zinc – required by a client who has a zinc deficiency as a result of the transport accident.
    • Vitamin E cream – to treat scarring for up to two years post-accident.
    • Glucosamine – in oral form to treat osteoarthritis affecting non-spinal joint.
    • Hypericum (St John’s Wort) – to replace PBS and/or private script medications for the treatment of accident related depressive disorders.
    • Vaccinium Macrocarpon (Cranberry product) – for the prevention of urinary tract infections in accident-related neuropathic bladders.
  • Scar concealing products.
  • Dose administration aids and the reasonable weekly refill cost.
  • Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as gels, creams and sprays – for a period of six weeks, immediately after an accident or following surgery.
  • Infant formula products recommended by a medical practitioner and required as a result of a transport accident injury.
  • Sunscreen, where required, to counteract the effects of sun-sensitive medications or for patients with skin grafting and burn injuries.

Controlled medicines and drugs of dependence

Some medications if misused or overused have a high risk potential for harm, dependence and accidental death from poisoning. Controlled medications are subject to strict controls under the law and include medications such as sedatives and opioid analgesics.

If you have been prescribed a controlled medication, it is important that you pay close attention to any instructions from your doctor and pharmacist, to minimise the risks associated with taking a medication of this type. We encourage you to seek further information from your medical practitioner or pharmacist or see: Pharmacy Framework.

How treatments and services are paid for

We pay for your medication:

  • Directly to your pharmacist, when you have given them your TAC claim number, or
  • If you have to pay, use myTAC to send a copy of your receipt to us and we will repay you. Ask for a full pharmacy/dispensary receipt, which includes medication details and Medicare item numbers, and is more detailed than a cash register receipt.

We pay for your services in line with our responsibilities under the Transport Accident Act 1986.

How much we will pay

We will pay for your treatment and services according to our fee schedule. If your pharmacist charges more than the TAC rate, you may need to pay the difference.

We will pay for pharmacy and over-the-counter items in line with the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) where applicable. The Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) provides subsidised prescription medicines to residents of Australia.

Where your pharmacist charges above the PBS rate, or the over-the-counter item is not on the PBS, you may need to pay the difference, if it's not covered by Medicare and any private health insurance.

We can also pay for the reasonable cost of private scripts dispensed by a pharmacy. If the cost of your private script exceeds our rate, you may need to pay the gap.

If your accident was before 14 February 2018, we can only pay for these services once any required medical excess has been reached. Find out if the medical excess applies to you.

For providers

If you are a provider of pharmacy services, please refer to our TAC Provider Guidelines.

Pharmacy Framework

The Guiding Principles for Medicine Management for the Transport Accident Commission, Clients and Providers

Introduction

The Transport Accident Commission (TAC) recognises that it is a partner in achieving better health outcomes in conjunction with the Commonwealth Government and Victorian State Government in line with The National Medicines Policy 1999, The National Drug Strategy (2010-2015), The National Strategy for the Quality Use of Medicines 2002, The National Pain Strategy (2010) and The National Mental health Policy 2008.  As a partner the TAC is resolutely committed to be engaged in a cooperative endeavour to bring about better health outcomes focusing on access to, and best practice use, of medicines.  This includes prescription medicines, non-prescription medicines and complementary healthcare products.

Access to Medicines

The TAC acknowledges that there are potential risks associated with the access to and use of medicines by its clients.  These risks, as well as the potential public health implications, are primarily addressed through the scheduling of medicines by the Therapeutic Goods Administration.  Access to medicines is further controlled by the intervention of suitably qualified health practitioners to ensure appropriate use of medicines by patients. The TAC overlays this existing guidance with its own policies controlling the access to medicine requiring compliance on behalf of health practitioners and clients in order to secure funding for medicines.

Administration of Medicines in the Community

The TAC acknowledges that there is an existing framework that regulates the administration of medicines once they have been prescribed and dispensed for an individual.  The TAC requires its providers to take into account all existing legislative obligations in determining their own policies, guidelines, protocols and training for the administration of medicines to clients in the community.  The TAC makes provision within its own policies for appropriate conduct and training for health professionals and aligns with existing Victorian State Government legislative requirements where applicable; for example the Nurses Act 1993.  Where there is no guiding legislation, the TAC has developed its own policies that determine the threshold of qualification and conduct required to satisfy requests for funding medicines.

Quality, Safety and Efficacy of Medicines

All partners in the National Medicines Policy 2000 are complicit in considering the quality, safety and efficacy of medicines available.  To this end, the TAC aligns with the national standardised regulation of medicines via the Therapeutic Goods Administration.  The TAC implements its own regime of policy controls which overlays the requirements that exist in the Therapeutic Goods Administration’s scheduling as a condition of funding medicines for TAC clients.

Quality Use of Medicines

TAC recognises that Australia has an established and well accepted national policy on the quality use of medicines.  The TAC in alignment with the National Medicines Policy 2000 considers that all medicines should be used:

  • judiciously – medicines, whether prescribed, recommended, and/or self-selected should be used only when appropriate, with non-medicinal alternatives considered as needed;
  • appropriately – choosing the most appropriate medicine, taking into account factors such as the clinical condition being treated, the potential risks and benefits of treatment, dosage, length of treatment, and cost;
  • safely – misuse, including overuse and underuse, should be minimised; and
  • efficaciously – the medicines must achieve the goals of therapy by delivering beneficial changes in actual health outcomes.

To achieve quality use of medicines TAC clients must be provided with the most appropriate treatment, and have the knowledge and skills to use medicines to their best effect. The TAC in partnership with treating health practitioners have an important role to play in promoting the quality use of medicines through collaboration, communication, development and implementation of models of best practice.  The TAC, health care professionals and providers of medicines all play an important role in making sure that clients receive suitable information and/or assistance so that they are able to take their medicines correctly.

To support the achievement of the optimum use of medicines the TAC has a dedicated Clinical Panel to provide clinical support and advice to health professionals treating people injured in a transport accident.  The Clinical Panel is made up of experienced health professionals and also provides clinical support and advice to TAC Claims staff to ensure that decisions related to the provision of medicines are informed and justified.

Quality use of medicines depends on committed teamwork between all members of the partnership on behalf of the Australian community.

Risk Management

The TAC has a duty of care to its clients to protect them against products, production process and services that are hazardous to health or life.  The TAC is responsible for having a system in place that meets its own legislative functions under the Transport Accident Act 1986 section 11 in delivering compensation to its clients in socially and economically appropriate manner.  Accordingly the TAC has implemented a number of policies surrounding the payment of medicines.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Resources

All health care professionals, care workers and TAC clients should have access to current, accurate and balanced information about medicines including Consumer Medicine Information and advice about medicine use in a timely manner.

It is imperative that health care professionals establish a client’s level of understanding of their medication including how to take it and the consequences of what happens if they do not administer the medication in the correct manner.  Health care professionals should take into account the client’s literacy, language skills and cultural background in the context of their medication regime.

The following resources provide information about prescription, non-prescription medicines and complementary health care products for clients and health care professionals. Please note that the information provided below is not moderated by the TAC and that the TAC makes no warranty as to the relevance or accuracy of the information. 1

Adverse Medicine Events Line

The Adverse Medicine Events Line allows consumers to report or receive advice on adverse medicine events.

Telephone 1300 134 237

Australian Council for Safety and Quality in Health Care

The 10 Tips for Safer Health Care booklet has been produced by the Safety and Quality Council to assist people to become more actively involved in their health care. It explains how and why things can go wrong, and how consumers can work in partnership with their health care professionals to get the best possible care. The booklet also:

  • gives 10 tips for improving health care, which include questions consumers might like to ask their health care professional
  • outlines what consumers can expect from their health care professional
  • lists some sources of information for consumers to find out more about their condition and how to manage medicines; and
  • explains what consumers can do if they have concerns about their health care.

For more information see www.safetyandquality.org/index.cfm?page=publication#10tips

Consumer Medicine Information (CMI)

CMI is designed to inform consumers about prescription and pharmacist-only medicines. CMI leaflets are brand specific and are produced by the pharmaceutical company that makes the particular medicine. They might be included in the medicine package, but can always be requested from the pharmacist or doctor. A CMI guide is available, which provides information about how CMI can be used by consumers and health care professionals to build better relationships to achieve the quality use of medicines. Refer to:

HealthInsite

HealthInsite is an Australian Government initiative, funded by the Department of Health and Ageing. It aims to improve the health of Australians by providing easy access to quality information about human health. Go to: www.healthinsite.gov.au

Medicines Line

Medicines Line gives consumers access to independent, accurate, up-to-date and specific information about medicines, provided by experienced medicines information specialists and clinical pharmacists. Telephone 1300 888 763.

Medicines Talk

Medicines Talk is produced by consumers, for consumers, to encourage and promote quality use of medicines, especially among people who use multiple medicines. Medicines Talk can be downloaded in PDF format from the NPS web site: www.nps.org.au/site.php?content+/resources/content/cons_medtalk.html Telephone (02) 8217 8700.

Medimate

Medimate is a brochure produced by the National Prescribing Service (NPS) to help consumers find, understand and use information about medicines. Medimate encourages consumers to do this in partnership with their doctors, pharmacists, and other health care professionals. Medimate covers prescription medicines, non‑prescription medicines and complementary health care products. It includes advice about keeping healthy with and without medicines, how to use medicines safely, and using multiple medicines safely. Medimate also includes a special medicines list in which consumers can list their medicines and keep notes. Available at: www.nps.org.au Telephone (02)8217 8700

Veterans’ MATES

Veterans’ MATES (Medicines Advice and Therapeutics Education Services) is a Department of Veterans’ Affairs program designed to address medicines usage by veterans and war widows and to reduce medicines misadventure. The Department works closely with the University of South Australia, Quality Use of Medicines and Pharmacy Research Centre, which has formed a consortium with the National Prescribing Service, Drug and Therapeutics Information Service, Australian Medicines Handbook, University of Adelaide Department of General Practice and Public Health, and the Pharmacy Department of Daw Park Hospital, for delivery of the program. Veterans’ MATES uses prescription data to identify veterans who may be at risk of medication misadventure and provides information which may assist in improving their medication management. GPs are provided with feedback on their veteran patients and information detailing current clinical guidelines through mailout. The program also provides educational materials to veterans and their carers to assist in improving medication management at home. Veterans’ MATES will deliver ten modules targeting specific clinical and therapeutic topics over the next three years. The modules will include material for GPs, other health care professionals and veterans.

Adverse Drug Reactions Advisory Committee (ADRAC)

The ADRAC encourages reporting of all suspected adverse reactions to medicines, including suspected reactions to new medicines, suspected interactions of medicines, and suspected reactions causing death, admission to hospital or prolongation of hospitalisation, increased investigations or treatment, or birth defects. The ADRAC produces the Australian Adverse Drug Reactions Bulletin six times a year. The bulletin lists current drugs of interest to ADRAC, and referenced information on drugs that are the subject of reports to ADRAC. Contact the ADRAC Secretariat: Telephone 1800044114, email adrac@health.gov.au or refer to www.tga.gov.au/adr/index/htm

Australian Drug Information for the Health Care Professional (AusDI)

AusDI is a comprehensive, authoritative, unbiased source of drug and therapeutic information developed for Australian pharmacists, doctors, nurses and other health care professionals. It is a database of single and family generic drug information monographs, including the most commonly used complementary health care products. Information is available at: www.ausdi.com

Australian Medicines Handbook (AMH)

The AMH provides a source of readily accessible, concise, up to date independent drug information to facilitate effective, rational, safe and economical prescribing. Available at: www.amh.net.au

Australian Medicines Handbook (AMH) Drug Choice Companion: Aged Care

This contains independent drug information that promotes safe and rational use of medicines in older Australians. Available at: www.amh.net.au/dcc.html

Australian Pharmaceutical Formulary (APF)

The APF and Handbook (APF) is designed to assist pharmacists in providing pharmaceutical services that promote optimal health outcomes through the quality use of medicines. APF-19 provides core information on therapeutics and standards of practice. Available at: www.psa.org.au

Australian Prescriber

Australian Prescriber is an independent publication providing readily accessible information about drugs and therapeutics. Available at: www.australianprescriber.com

Australian Prescription Products (APP) Guide

The APP Guide contains a comprehensive listing of prescription product information approved by the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) and compiled specifically for pharmacists. Available at: www.appco.com.au/appguide

Central Australian Rural Practitioners Association (CARPA) Standard Treatment Manual

CARPA developed this manual as a guide to standard treatment for those working in remote and rural communities in Central and Northern Australia. Available at: www.carpa.org.au

MIMS Annual

MIMS Annual is a comprehensive, up-to-date drug reference system. It is classified by therapeutic class, fully indexed, and contains complete, detailed, approved prescribing information for over 2000 prescription and non-prescription drugs. Available at: www.mims.com.au

National Prescribing Services (NPS)

The NPS is a not-for-profit Australian organisation established to provide a source of evidence-based information about medicines. The NPS is independent of government and the pharmaceutical industry. Available at: www.nps.org.au

RADAR (Rational Assessment of Drugs and Research)

NPS RADAR provides timely, independent, evidence-based information on new drugs, research and PBS listings. It’s published by the National Prescribing Service (NPS) for general practitioners, specialists, pharmacists, other health care professionals and consumers. RADAR can be accessed over the internet, either by registering online to receive email alerts, or by simply logging on to the website. RADAR can also be accessed using one of the major prescribing software packages, or by emailing a request for a hard copy to: info@nps.org.au or refer to www.npsradar.org.au

Schedule of Pharmaceutical Benefits

The Schedule of Pharmaceutical Benefits provides information about the arrangements for doctors and participating dental practitioners to prescribe pharmaceutical benefits, and the supply of pharmaceutical benefits by approved pharmacists, approved doctors and approved hospital authorities. Available at www.health.gov.au/pbs/index.htm

Therapeutic Advice and Information (TAIS) Line

The National Prescribing Service provides a Therapeutic Advice and Information Service (TAIS) for health care professionals. For the cost of a local call, the TAIS provides immediate access to independent drug and therapeutics information. Telephone 1300138677, email tais@nps.org.au

Therapeutic Guidelines

Therapeutic Guidelines are disease-oriented guidelines for prescribing. They provide clear, practical and succinct recommendations for therapy, derived from the best available scientific evidence. Available at: Telephone 1800 061 260, sales@tg.com.au, www.tg.com.au


1The resources provided above are not updated or monitored by the TAC.  All enquiries should be directed to the relevant organisation.

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