More Campaigns

More Campaigns

The TAC has been involved in many drink driving campaigns throughout the years including outdoor signs, radio ads and other promotions. See below for other campaigns created and aired with the aim of a future where every journey is a safe one.

Drink driving is one of the biggest killers on Victoria's roads. Almost a quarter of all fatal crashes in Victoria involve a driver or rider with an illegal Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC).

As drink driving has become more and more socially unacceptable, the TAC's drink drive campaigns are often aimed at low level drink drivers - those who think it is ok to be "just a little bit over" or at the legal limit.  

Here are some common questions about drink driving limits. 

What is BAC? 

Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) is a measurement of the amount of alcohol in the body. BAC is measured in grams of alcohol per 100 millilitres of blood. The legal blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limit is 0.05. This means that a driver's body must contain less than 50 milligrams of alcohol per 100 millilitres of blood. A driver's BAC is measured by a simple breath test procedure. Most people find it difficult to gauge their own blood alcohol level as there are so many factors that you need to consider.

These include:

  • the amount of alcohol consumed
  • the period of time over which alcohol is consumed
  • your body mass
  • whether or not you have eaten
  • your fitness levels and
  • the health of your liver.

Because everyone is different, some people need to drink less than the standard hourly recommendations to maintain a BAC level below the legal limit. 

How does alcohol affect driving performance? 

Driving is a complex task requiring decision making and total concentration. Alcohol affects a driver's ability to be totally in control of his or her actions. 

BAC levels and their affects:

  • 0.02 to 0.05 BAC - the ability to see or locate moving lights correctly is diminished, as is the ability to judge distances. The tendency to take risks is increased, and the ability to respond to several stimuli is decreased.
  • 0.05 to 0.08 BAC - the ability to judge distances is reduced, sensitivity to red lights is impaired, reactions are slower and concentration span shorter. At 0.08 BAC drivers are five times more likely to have an accident than before they started drinking.
  • 0.08 to 0.12 BAC - euphoria sets in, overestimation of one's abilities leads to reckless driving, peripheral vision is impaired (resulting in accidents due to hitting vehicles in passing) and perception of obstacles is impaired. Drivers are up to 10 times more likely to have an accident.

What is the current law relating to drink driving? 

P plate drivers must have a BAC of zero. Drivers of heavy trucks, buses, trains and trams must maintain a zero BAC level while on the road in most of Australia. Motorcyclists in their first year of riding also must maintain a zero BAC while on the road. Penalties for drink-driving offences include disqualification from driving for a specified period, fines and imprisonment. In Victoria, a BAC reading of 0.15 or higher results in suspension of the driver's licence on the spot, until the case is heard in court. Since 13 May 2002 , Victorian courts can order anyone committing a repeat drink driver offence or driving with a BAC reading of more than 0.15 to have an alcohol interlock device fitted to their car, motorbike or truck ignition. See VicRoads for more details.

 

Drink driving is one of the biggest killers on Victoria's roads. Almost a quarter of all fatal crashes in Victoria involve a driver or rider with an illegal Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC).

As drink driving has become more and more socially unacceptable, the TAC's drink drive campaigns are often aimed at low level drink drivers - those who think it is ok to be "just a little bit over" or at the legal limit.  

Here are some common questions about drink driving limits. 

What is BAC? 

Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) is a measurement of the amount of alcohol in the body. BAC is measured in grams of alcohol per 100 millilitres of blood. The legal blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limit is 0.05. This means that a driver's body must contain less than 50 milligrams of alcohol per 100 millilitres of blood. A driver's BAC is measured by a simple breath test procedure. Most people find it difficult to gauge their own blood alcohol level as there are so many factors that you need to consider.

These include:

  • the amount of alcohol consumed
  • the period of time over which alcohol is consumed
  • your body mass
  • whether or not you have eaten
  • your fitness levels and
  • the health of your liver.

Because everyone is different, some people need to drink less than the standard hourly recommendations to maintain a BAC level below the legal limit. 

How does alcohol affect driving performance? 

Driving is a complex task requiring decision making and total concentration. Alcohol affects a driver's ability to be totally in control of his or her actions. 

BAC levels and their affects:

  • 0.02 to 0.05 BAC - the ability to see or locate moving lights correctly is diminished, as is the ability to judge distances. The tendency to take risks is increased, and the ability to respond to several stimuli is decreased.
  • 0.05 to 0.08 BAC - the ability to judge distances is reduced, sensitivity to red lights is impaired, reactions are slower and concentration span shorter. At 0.08 BAC drivers are five times more likely to have an accident than before they started drinking.
  • 0.08 to 0.12 BAC - euphoria sets in, overestimation of one's abilities leads to reckless driving, peripheral vision is impaired (resulting in accidents due to hitting vehicles in passing) and perception of obstacles is impaired. Drivers are up to 10 times more likely to have an accident.

What is the current law relating to drink driving? 

P plate drivers must have a BAC of zero. Drivers of heavy trucks, buses, trains and trams must maintain a zero BAC level while on the road in most of Australia. Motorcyclists in their first year of riding also must maintain a zero BAC while on the road. Penalties for drink-driving offences include disqualification from driving for a specified period, fines and imprisonment. In Victoria, a BAC reading of 0.15 or higher results in suspension of the driver's licence on the spot, until the case is heard in court. Since 13 May 2002 , Victorian courts can order anyone committing a repeat drink driver offence or driving with a BAC reading of more than 0.15 to have an alcohol interlock device fitted to their car, motorbike or truck ignition. See VicRoads for more details.

 

When - Metropolitan

September 2006 – You will get caught, it's just a matter of when

When (Metro) opens with the words, 'Say when'. The commercial covers different scenarios as a driver narrowly misses out on being breath tested. 'Tonight?' - driving with a mate he sees a police car with flashing lights but it overtakes and speeds on after someone else. 'Next week?' He is driving home dropping a few mates off after cricket, turns into a side street and an unmarked police car is conducting breath tests. He is waved on. 'Next month?' He is driving home with his girlfriend and is pulled over and tested, he is over the limit. The message is simple -  you will get caught, it's just a matter of when.

Image of outdoor signs

When - Regional Campaign

Image of outdoor signs 

Netball

November 2004 - the consequences of a conviction for drink driving

A father faces anger, shame and embarassment when he's unable to drive his daughter to her weekly netball game. We see them walking through a country town, only to arrive late with one of the other parents shooting him an accusing look. We are then shown a flashback of him being pulled up by police for drink driving who disregard his pleas to be let off. 

Insurance

November 2004

Here we see a worker renewing his car insurance and through the course of the call says he was recently caught for drink driving. He is shocked to hear that a drink driving record will affect his car insurance policy for many years through higher excesses, this is regardless of his rating or whether or not he's had a crash. Another commercial highlighting the consequences of drink driving.

Image of Insurance campaign

Unemployed

2004

We overhear the conversation of a guy on the phone in a suburban family home. He's trying to arrange an extension on the payment of a bill. Gradually we realise that he is getting by on unemployment benefits. A flashback then shows him getting out of a work van and being lead away by police for drink driving. He vainly tries to explain that he needs his licence to work. Another realistic commercial showing the consequences of drink driving.

Image from Unemployed campaign

Boat

2004

It's a perfect, sunny day - the sort of day that we should all be out enjoying. A boat is parked in a suburban yard, showing signs of lack of use. then we see the reason - the owner and his mates were out fishing when they were pulled over by police and the driver breath tested. Although he has had the least to drink of the group, he breaths over the limit and loses his driver's licence and his boat licence. This ad is part of the series - Only a little bit over? You bloody idiot.

Image from the Boat campaign

 

Little Bit Worried

2003

Here we follow a driver who leaves a carpark outside a pub and hear his thoughts on how much he's had to drink yet he still drives. 'Only a little bit worried?', 'Only a little bit nervous' and 'Only a little bit wrong' all flash across the screen as we hear him later plead to police he is "Only a little bit over".

Image from Little Bit Worried Campaign

See the Light

December 2001

See the Light (Booze Bus and Police Car) These two linked advertisements highlight the increased chances of drink drivers being caught if they risk drink driving. The chance of being caught is greater because of more booze buses operating for longer periods, more unmarked police cars and a tough approach to enforcement at .05 and above.

Blue Squares

December 2001

Blue Squares reinforces the strong message that more police will be out in force targeting drink drivers with more cars and more booze buses pulling drivers over.

Never

December 2000

Never shows the impact of a drink driving fatality on those closest to the victim - both a young woman's father (who will never see her marry or have children) and her boyfriend. Filmed like an advertisement for a new car, this commercial is part of the enforcement campaign.

Stop

August 2000

Here we are shown people in a variety of situations saying "No" to their next drink - at a BBQ, the footy, a pub, a restaurant. The final scenes show someone sitting in a booze bus having lost their licence and copped a hefty fine. Another in the campaigns theme of reminding drivers to stop and think before drinking and driving.

The Pub

March 2000

This commercial targets the typical repeat drink driver who, unlike his mates, persists in driving home from the pub after he has been drinking. The result is two pedestrians are killed and he is jailed for culpable driving.

Waiting Game

September 1998

Here we see celebrations at a football club after s ein. An older man is serving drinks and leading the party, as well as having a few drinks himself. He leaves the club late, drives home and is tested for drink driving. The result? Immediate loss of licence.

Back Streets

September 1998

Back Streets shows a couple driving home after dinner with friends and deciding to take the back streets to avoid being picked up. The woman driver is pulled over for a broken tail-light and is breathalysed at the same time. She is found to be over the limit.

John and Jessica

February 1998

Set in a hospital emergency ward, the advertisement shows the aftermath of a crash. A couple is arguing with her saying "I said I wanted to get a bloody taxi." John resists a blood test knowing that he is over the limit yet is informed that the passenger in the other car has died. A commercial showing the emotion linked with drink driving and trauma.

Double Whammy

January 1998

Double Whammy shows anytime you get pulled over, you can get breath tested, Here a business man is driving back from a meeting - speeding and talking on his mobile. he is pulled over by the police and tested for alcohol. The aim of this ad is to show police carry speed lasers as well as breathalysers.

1000 Booze Buses

1997

We produced a range of advertisements supporting police drink driving enforcement both with booze buses and police cars. The emphasis is on the wide range of circumstances in which drivers may face a random breath test.

Covert

October 1997

The advertisement shows a driver being pulled over and breathalysed by an unmarked police car. It shows that now every police car operates as a booze bus.

Prison

November 1995

 We see the consequences of drink driving with a man in prison being visited by his wife and children. He says he is sorry and has a flash back to the pub wehere he was having a few drinks followed by the accident he caused which killed the other driver and a young boy.

Silent Night

December 1994

Silent Night is set at an office Christmas party where a man tries to convince his mates that he is fine to drive. A series of crash scenes from previous TAC advertisements are shown to the music of 'Silent Night'. The advertisement closes with the line "Should you be driving home tonight?"

Flashback

September 1994

The advertisement features a young man reliving the horrors of a crash to his wife. He explains he was drunk and he couldn't forget he had killed someone. It is only as he turns away from her we become aware that he is in a wheelchair.

Country Random Breath Testing

December 1993

This commercial shows the consequences of drink driving in a country area. The commercial shows two men driving in town and then being breathalysed by a mobile booze bus. The driver is over the limit and loses his licence. We then see him waiting for a taxi by the side of the road.

Glasses

September 1993

In this commercial we see the effects of alcohol. Here the advertisement shows the driver's view of the road, with empty beer glasses appearing in his line of vision. The more glasses, the more blurred the view. The driver has an accident and his young wife is told of the crash by the police.

Booze Bus

September 1990

The introduction of booze buses in Victoria was launched through this commercial. We see a range of people and their reactions to the penalties they face when over the legal limit of 0.05.