Blood Oath

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Video transcript

We look out for each other.
It’s in our blood.

You should do the same
for your mates,

especially in a car.

’Cause how would you feel
if somebody got hurt or killed?

So make a blood oath to look after
your mates when you’re driving.

Do it now on Facebook
at mybloodoath.

By making an oath, you can also
help your local footy team

win cash rewards.

Will you swear
to look after your mates?

ALL: (SHOUT) Blood oath!

Your mate’s life is in your hands.


End of the transcript
YouTube Version Audio description file

Blood Oath

Fronted by two of the AFL’s toughest personalities, coaching twins Brad and Chris Scott, My Blood Oath reminds young men that “Your mate’s life is in your hands” and pushes the road safety message through football clubs at all levels.

My Blood Oath engaged young people through the Blood Oath Facebook page, www.facebook.com/mybloodoath and local football clubs. People were encouraged to nominate their footy club, make an oath to drive safely and sharing that oath with their family and friends.

Young male drivers who take risks on the roads are the target of the latest Transport Accident Commission (TAC) campaign, My Blood Oath.

Fronted by two of the AFL’s toughest personalities, coaching twins Brad and Chris Scott, My Blood Oath reminds young men that “Your mate’s life is in your hands” and pushes the road safety message through football clubs at all levels.

The campaign is supported by AFL Victoria and is the TAC’s largest ever social media venture.

My Blood Oath aims to engage young people through the campaign Facebook page, www.facebook.com/mybloodoath and local football clubs. A television advertisement, featuring the Scott brothers, will air for the first time today and run throughout July.

Young men are urged to get involved in the campaign by visiting the Facebook page, nominating their footy club, making an oath to drive safely, and sharing that oath with their family and friends.

Being a part of the Blood Oath could not only save your life, but save your footy club.  

 

Despite a large reduction in Victoria's road toll since 1989, the 18 to 25 year age group remains vastly over-represented in road trauma statistics. In their first year of driving, young Victorians are almost four times more likely to be involved in a fatal or serious injury crash than more experienced drivers.

While 18 to 25 year olds represent around 14% of licenced drivers, they accounted for approximately 28% of all drivers killed on Victoria's roads.

A review of young drivers by the Australian Federal Office of Road Safety, now the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB), found them to be at greater risk on the roads for a variety of reasons including:

  • lack of experience
  • limited ability and judgement
  • underestimation of risks
  • deliberate risk-taking behaviours and
  • use of alcohol and drugs.

As part of a co-ordinated effort to reduce the incidence, severity and cost to the community of road crashes involving young people, the TAC developed a youth strategy aimed at pre-drivers, learner drivers and probationary drivers. The strategy includes the programs and initiatives of the TAC's road safety partners: VicRoads, Victoria Police and the RACV.

Launched in March 1999, the HELP campaign aims to achieve long-term reductions in the youth road toll by:

  • reducing deliberate risk-taking behaviour
  • increasing learner driver experience and
  • providing a research platform to address young driver behaviour.

A Graduated Licensing System (GLS) has now been introduced in Victoria with new requirements for learner drivers, probationary license holders and young drivers aged up to 25. You can find out more at the Victorian Road Safety Strategy website.

 

More than 350 young drivers aged 18 – 25 have been killed in Victoria in the last 10 years – representing one in four or 25% of drivers killed in Victoria in this period.

In 2015, 22% of drivers killed were aged between 18 and 25 years, with this age group only representing around 13% of Victorian licence holders.young lives lost to 2015 graph

Of the 27 young drivers killed in 2015:

  • 78% were males
  • 63% were killed on country roads
  • 56% were killed in single vehicle crashes
  • 67% were killed in crashes that occurred during high alcohol times
  • 67% of deaths occurred on 100km/h signposted roads

Note: High alcohol times are those times of the day and week when casualty crashes are ten times more likely to involve alcohol than casualty crashes at other times.

 

 

Despite a large reduction in Victoria's road toll since 1989, the 18 to 25 year age group remains vastly over-represented in road trauma statistics. In their first year of driving, young Victorians are almost four times more likely to be involved in a fatal or serious injury crash than more experienced drivers.

While 18 to 25 year olds represent around 14% of licenced drivers, they accounted for approximately 28% of all drivers killed on Victoria's roads.

A review of young drivers by the Australian Federal Office of Road Safety, now the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB), found them to be at greater risk on the roads for a variety of reasons including:

  • lack of experience
  • limited ability and judgement
  • underestimation of risks
  • deliberate risk-taking behaviours and
  • use of alcohol and drugs.

As part of a co-ordinated effort to reduce the incidence, severity and cost to the community of road crashes involving young people, the TAC developed a youth strategy aimed at pre-drivers, learner drivers and probationary drivers. The strategy includes the programs and initiatives of the TAC's road safety partners: VicRoads, Victoria Police and the RACV.

Launched in March 1999, the HELP campaign aims to achieve long-term reductions in the youth road toll by:

  • reducing deliberate risk-taking behaviour
  • increasing learner driver experience and
  • providing a research platform to address young driver behaviour.

A Graduated Licensing System (GLS) has now been introduced in Victoria with new requirements for learner drivers, probationary license holders and young drivers aged up to 25. You can find out more at the Victorian Road Safety Strategy website.