Lives Lost - Year to Date

Daily lives lost update

Calendar year to midnight 18 October 2017

2016 Lives lost 2017 Lives lost
228 195 (down 14.5%)
Fatalities (equivalent periods)
2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 5 year
average
220 182 198 204 228 206
Gender
Gender 2016 2017 Change % change 5 year
average
Female 63 54 -9 -14% 60
Male 165 141 -24 -15% 146
Unknown 0 0 0 0% 0
Road user
Road user 2016 2017 Change % change 5 year
average
Bicyclist 6 8 2 33% 6
Driver 121 98 -23 -19% 103
Motorcyclist* 43 31 -12 -28% 30
Passenger 25 35 10 40% 35
Pedestrian 33 23 -10 -30% 31
Unknown 0 0 0 0% 0
Location
Location 2016 2017 Change % change 5 year
average
Melbourne 111 81 -30 -27% 95
Rural vic 117 113 -4 -3% 112
Unknown 0 1 1 100% 0
Age Group
Age Group 2016 2017 Change % change 5 year
average
0 to 4 2 2 0 0% 2
5 to 15 2 3 1 50% 4
16 to 17 5 3 -2 -40% 5
18 to 20 14 17 3 21% 16
21 to 25 23 22 -1 -4% 20
26 to 29 17 14 -3 -18% 16
30 to 39 30 25 -5 -17% 28
40 to 49 39 28 -11 -28% 28
50 to 59 31 22 -9 -29% 25
60 to 69 22 20 -2 -9% 22
70 and over 42 38 -4 -10% 39
Unknown 1 1 0 0% 1
Level of urbanisation
Level of urbanisation 2016 2017 Change % change 5 year
average
Provincial cities/towns 22 12 -10 -45% 17
Rural roads 109 116 7 6% 109
Small towns/hamlets 2 3 1 50% 4
Urban Melbourne** 95 64 -31 -33% 77
Unknown 0 0 0 0% 0
* includes pillion riders
** Melbourne Statistical Division includes some rural roads
Note: Fatality data is compiled by the TAC from police reports supplied by Victoria Police. Fatality data is revised each day, with the exception of weekends and public holidays. Data is subject to revision as additional information about known accidents is received, and as new accident reports are received and processed.
5 year average rounded to nearest whole number

Why the change from calling it 'Road Toll' to 'Lives Lost'?

The problem with talking about 'road toll' is that it implies that road trauma is an acceptable cost of having roads. A toll is the price we pay for using something - with toll roads, for example, it’s a few dollars.

Road toll wording also has the effect of dehumanising road trauma. By reducing people’s lives to a number, it makes it easier for the community to feel distanced from the issue.  These are not just numbers, they are people - someone’s child, mother, father, sister, brother, friend or colleague.

If we accept this 'road toll' as the price of a rural lifestyle or getting from A to B, another 2,500 people will die in the next 10 years and 50,000 people will be hospitalised with serious and life changing injuries.

The fact is we’re talking about people who have died. Instead of saying, “our road toll stands at 150", let’s say "150 lives lost on Victorian roads”.

The price we pay for using the road shouldn’t be death or serious injury.

Towards Zero

Reducing road trauma is a shared responsibility. TAC is working towards a future free of deaths and serious injuries on our roads.

https://www.tac.vic.gov.au/__data/assets/video_file/0010/158149/Towards-Zero-Man-On-The-Street.mp4 https://www.tac.vic.gov.au/__data/assets/image/0020/158150/TACC0578_Video-Thumbnail_380x214_v1.jpg https://www.tac.vic.gov.au/__data/assets/file/0005/158153/TACV196.srt https://www.tac.vic.gov.au/__data/assets/file/0006/158154/TAC-Toward-Zero-Man-On-The-Street-Vision-Impaired-Narrative.mp3

Whats is towards Zero?